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[Web Creator] [LMSOFT]
In his work alongside Georges Mandel, Robert Peyronie’s tenacity was also the lifeblood of his political career. One had to be tenacious to face the hostile crowds that swarmed to contradict Mandel at his election rallies. The heated election campaigns of Georges Mandel were part of the Médoc folklore, with lively discussions and confrontation in keeping with the personality of the main character. In 1928, when Mandel was sure he had lost the election, the tenacious Robert Peyronie, having counted the votes again and again, informed him of his close yet undeniable victory.

With Mandel, who almost never slept, one had to be available at all times, night and day, like in 1917 when it appeared that Verdun was about to fall. Mandel became Post and Communications Minister in 1934 and has three telephones installed in the Peyronie home, one in the office, one in the bedroom and one in the kitchen. It is ironic that it was during his term of office that the international telephone switchboard was installed in Vichy, an innovation that led to the choice of Vichy as the capital of occupied France.